It’s now tomorrow…

It took some time for me to get back to blogging.  Real life got in the way the past few months…but I am back….

To continue with my theme “Computing for the Rest of Us”, I want to continue discussing computing issues unique to rural communities.  One of the benefits of living in a small, rural community is the slower pace and lifestyle.  Basically, I find the stress level much lower than what I experienced while living and working in Silicon Valley and the Boston I-495 loop.  Example, I now walk to most of my  appointments, to go shopping and to visits friends.  I like to say this about about the small community I now call home…”stress here, is self inflicted”.   But, when it comes to computing, there are some challenges….That’s what I will be discussing…

The first thing I would like to focus on is this: “a jack of all trades is a master of none”.  How does this apply to computing?  Simple, just like your automobile, four-wheeler and/or lawn mower a computer must be maintained, serviced and sometimes repaired.  Sure, learning how to maintain and repair a computer is not rocket science, but there is a learning curve.  So, I suggest the following to all my friends, colleagues and online acquaintances residing in remote, rural locations: (1) learn the basics of computer maintenance  and (2) either learn the basics of computer repair or pay someone to repair your computer.   Now more on these points…

Point one, maintenance:  I always loved the old Fram oil filter commercial, “pay me now, or pay me later”.  It usually was accompanied with a seasoned mechanic standing over an automobile with the hood raised and steam coming from everywhere.  The commercial had a very simple theme, regular maintenance for your car and you would not have to experience an expensive repair later.  The same applies to computers; regular maintenance will extend the life of your desktop, laptop or tablet.  For desktops and laptops, invest in a can of compressed air.  The primary culprits for destroying computers are dust and heat!  Keeping the air vents on your desktop computer or laptop clear and free of dust goes a long way in extending it’s life.  Dust clogs the air vents and fans, causing the heat inside the computer to rise.  Heat causes the central processing unit (cpu) to work harder, shortening its lifespan.  It also places additional wear on the fan(s) and power supply.

Point two: repair:  Working on a computer without a basic knowledge of computer architecture is a recipe for disaster!  Most desktops, laptops and tablets share a common architecture/design which is actually elegantly simple.  Rather than go into a detailed discussion of computer architecture, remember this; no computer, tablet or smart phone can operate without a motherboard, central processing unit, memory (RAM), and the means to communicate with external devices and applications.  The key to extending the life and usefulness of your device is to find that person in your community who has a decent, working knowledge of computers and let him/her work or your device….

I made a promise to myself and my significant other that I would not spend more than 90 minutes each day on this blog.  My 90 minutes are up for today…we will continue this topic tomorrow…

 

 

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